William Long Whitesell, L.L.C.

What happens if you're accused of selling marijuana in Georgia?

Georgia has made some progress in terms of marijuana policy in recent years. There is now a limited medical marijuana program which allows for the treatment of a few severe medical conditions with a very specific form of marijuana oil. Unfortunately, the form of marijuana oil permitted, oils with THC levels of less than 5 percent, may not be medically sufficient for those with intractable epilepsy or other serious conditions. Worse yet, those who make and sell marijuana extracts and concentrates face severe penalties, as do those who sell marijuana in its natural state for illegal recreational use in Georgia.

While allowing for some medical use is a step in the right direction, the current law leaves a lot of people behind. Worse yet, it criminalizes those who provide critical medicine to some very sick people. Whether you're accused of selling small amounts of smokeable marijuana for personal use or high potency marijuana oils for those with severe illnesses, you could be facing felony charges and a long time in prison if you plead guilty or get convicted by a jury.

Georgia's penalties for marijuana are severe

Possessing any amount of natural state marijuana with intent to distribute it, from less than an ounce up to 10 pounds, is a felony punishable by between one and ten years in prison and a fine of up to $5,000. Those charged with possessing more than ten pounds but less than 2,000 could spend between five and thirty years in jail and pay a $100,000 fine. Those charged with selling the same amounts face the same penalties.

Marijuana extracts and oils carry even steeper penalties. Possessing less than a gram is a felony offense punishable by between one and three years in prison and a fine of $5,000. Possessing more than a gram is also a felony that carries between one and eight years in jail and a $5,000 fine. If you are charged with manufacturing, selling or possessing with intent to distribute any amount, the penalties are between five and thirty years in prison, as well as a $5,000 fine. Even if you were helping those with serious medical conditions, you likely won't be able to use a medical defense in the courtroom.

An attorney can help push for a better outcome

With penalties this severe and the potential for a felony record, possession with intent or sale of marijuana charges are very serious. You should speak with an experienced Georgia defense attorney as soon as you're charged. Your attorney can review the details of your situation and help you figure out what your best options for defense are. From contesting the chain of evidence possession to issues with the warrant, your attorney can help you explore all your options for a defense against serious marijuana charges.

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